Written answers

Thursday, 21 July 2011

7:00 pm

Photo of Seán FlemingSeán Fleming (Laois-Offaly, Fianna Fail)
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Question 634: To ask the Minister for Health his plans to introduce a ban on smoking in cars which are transporting children under 16 years; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [22049/11]

Photo of James ReillyJames Reilly (Minister, Department of Health; Dublin North, Fine Gael)
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It is recognised that smoking in cars exposes all the occupants to harmful environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). ETS is a carcinogen and contains the same cancer-causing substances and toxic agents that are inhaled by the smoker. There is no safe level of exposure to ETS.

Exposure to cigarette smoke is particularly dangerous in enclosed spaces, such as cars, and parents and others with responsibility for the welfare of children have a particular responsibility to ensure that such exposure does not take place.

While legislative measures have been introduced in a small number of countries in relation to smoking in cars with children the nature of the measures and of the accompanying compliance and enforcement arrangements have varied significantly. In some jurisdictions smoking in cars is treated as a driving offence while in other jurisdictions it has taken the form of an education tool aimed at highlighting the dangers of smoking in cars. Any proposal to introduce a ban on smoking in cars must, therefore, be evidence based, with data on the extent to which it occurs and the actual risks to public health. Consideration will also need to be given as to the extent to which it may be appropriate to deal with the issue as a road safety and a public health issue.

Before any new measures in this area are considered, it will, at the outset, be necessary to establish the extent of the problem. Thereafter, the successful introduction of measures with regard to smoking in cars will benefit from the roll-out of a public information and education campaign to mobilise public support.

A similar approach proved very successful in the introduction of the smoke free at work initiative and other tobacco control initiatives in the interim. These provisions were underpinned by a clear evidence-base, good planning, the mobilisation of public opinion by way of a public education and information campaign, and simple, clear and enforceable legislation.

Proposals relating to smoking in cars are being considered in the context of the Tobacco Policy Review currently underway in my Department and are expected to be completed and submitted to me within a matter of months. I have already signalled that I am in favour of legislating in this area but would like to see a public information and education campaign to highlight the dangers associated with exposure to ETS in cars and to mobilise public support in advance of the introduction of legislation.

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